Accident anger

News this week of a third serious accident at a notorious intersection in Birdwood has understandably left locals shaken and upset.
For years they have warned authorities of the dangers at the intersection between Lucky Hit, Martin Hill and Warren roads, but to little avail.
Those warnings escalated in March when a two-month old boy died after he was involved in an accident there and again less than two weeks later when emergency services were called to another crash at the same junction.
The community’s call for action has also been backed by the Adelaide Hills Council and Federal Member for Mayo Rebekha Sharkie.
The State Transport Minister has said that the site will be considered for black spot funding in the future.
The intersection has also been previously reviewed by the Transport Department, which has found that the existing set up, including give way signs at Lucky Hit and Martin Hill roads, is appropriate.
But while it may be appropriate on paper, recent history demonstrates that it is not appropriate in reality.
One life has already been lost to the junction this year, followed by at least three more accidents, two of them serious enough to warrant emergency crews and one serious enough to involve the medivac helicopter.
To add insult to injury, the latest accident involved one of the very volunteers who has undoubtedly spent many hours at the site in the past cleaning up other people’s accidents.
Changes to the intersection, including realigning Lucky Hit and Martin Hill roads to create a dogleg – forcing traffic on the minor roads to stop – is one solution that could be considered.
But locals are not expecting a major overhaul – they would be happy even just with stop signs and flashing warning signs, like those at the intersection of Pfeiffer, Riverview and Nairne roads in Woodside.
It’s true that the Government must follow consistent processes rather than changing roads at the whim of communities.
But after more than a dozen accidents there in less than seven years, including a fatality, it should be clear to anyone that action needs to be taken.

For the full report, see the print issue of The Courier.